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Nicole Hess

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You're Organization is Communicating Online - Even if You aren't Directing it

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Mac-serving-screensYou’re organization has an online statement – even if its not online.  How, you ask, is it making this statement? When someone mentions your organization (or business) to someone else, that person is going to search for you online.  Whatever appears is the beginning of your organization’s online communication.  If the searcher cannot find anything, you’re organization has just made a very bold online statement. Even if you have a website, if it doesn’t have current information, isn’t easily accessible or viewable on a mobile device, your online presence is still making a statement about your organization. So why should you care about your online statement?  How do you take hold and direct the conversation of your online presence?  Here are some basic insights to get you started. I can’t adapt to the technology Some of you may embrace your anachronistic ways in the technology driven world.  You use a phonograph to listen to your favorite albums and ice cream just isn’t as good as when you churn it yourself.  Yet you know that some people just don’t appreciate your time-honored traditions. Its just the same when you’re not using online media. Except it is not only a personal statement as using a phonograph would be, but it is a statement about your capabilities, your organization or your businesses capabilities as well. Saying, “I’m not online.”  Is saying “I’m not adapting to the globally used means of communication and I have nothing to share online.”  Probably not what you want potential clients or members to think. You are excluding anyone under the age of 30 With all the online marketing that is focused to the young members of society, these young people think that if your services are geared to them, then they will be able to find out about them online. For this age group it is also important to have some engagement beyond a stagnant website.  Again, age specific online marketing has developed complex interactive online experiences, this age group expects that you have a calendar of events so they can share the information and invite their friends, and see if what you have been doing is of any interest to them. I can’t afford any online support Whether this is true or false, it is better that this is not an immediate assumption of potential online visitors.  You want them to think that you are successful and stable with enough money to have a basic online presence. For example, Chevy and Ford have recently developed complex online microsites and interactive tools, despite the troubles of the car companies, they understand the importance of investing in an online experience. See Chevy’s microsite for Latin America “On the Road Again This also reiterates why its important to Tweet en Espanol While you may not be the owner of a billion-dollar company, there are small steps that say “I can afford to be online.”  All it takes is a little creativity.  For instance, there are free calendars that can be added to your website so that visitors can see upcoming or previous events.  How about adding the organization’s twitter feed?  That’s free as well.  Or spend a little money and have a nicely done video collage of presentations, product demonstrations, etc. And always remember that quality beats quantity. -Nicole Hess Online Media Consultant
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